Daisy Ridley To Play Gertrude Ederle As Young Woman In The Sea

Daisy Ridley To Play Gertrude Ederle As Young Woman In The Sea

Daisy Ridley To Play Gertrude Ederle As Young Woman In The Sea


Courtesy of WOWSA and Huntington Beach, California.

Gertrude Ederle is one of the most iconic figures in the open water swimming world. In 1926, two years after winning 3 Olympic medals, and a year after a DNF in her first attempt of a crossing, she shocked the world with the first swim across the English Channel by a women. In 14 hours 39 minutes, she swam nearly 2 hours faster than the men’s record at the time, held by Enrico Tiraboschi in 16 hours 33 minutes set in 1923.

The 19-year-old Ederle returned home to New York and received a massive ticker tape parade attended by an estimated 2 million people [see above].

Her story has been written by many people. But it was a book by Glenn Stout, entitled Young Woman and the Sea published in 2009, that was the basis of a screenplay by Jeff Nathanson and a film produced by Jerry Bruckheimer.

The film was acquired by Walt Disney Pictures for Disney+ and will star Daisy Ridley as Ederle.

Ridley is one of the world’s most recognizable film stars with lead roles in the Star Wars sequel trilogy: The Force Awakens (2015), The Last Jedi (2017), and The Rise of Skywalker (2019).

With the anticipated airing on Disney+ by Walt Disney Pictures, featuring one of the world’s most popular actresses, will boost the legacy of Gertrude beyond anything a marathon swimmer has experienced to date.

First Six People Across The English Channel:
1. Matthew Webb from England to France in 21 hours 45 minutes on August 24th 1875 (breaststroke)
2. Thomas Burgess from England to France in 22 hours 35 minutes on September 5th 1911
3. Henry Sullivan from England to France in 26 hours 50 minutes on August 5th 1923
4. Enrico Tiraboschi from France to England in 16 hours 33 minutes on August 11th 1923
5. Charles Toth from France to England in 16 hours 58 minutes on September 8th 1923
6. Gertrude Ederle from France to England in 14 hours 39 minutes on August 6th 1926

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