History Repeats Itself In The Open Water

History Repeats Itself In The Open Water

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California. In 1927, 105 men and women lined up on the shores of Santa Catalina Island to face a 20.2-mile crossing of the San Pedro Channel for the first time in human history. George Young of Canada (on left) was the only swimmer to successfully complete that race. The lone and widely covered successful crossing of the Catalina Channel was a demonstration in America how popular marathon swimming was – and would become. With marathon swims like the Rottnest Channel Swim annually drawing hundreds of swimming of all ages and abilities, it is no wonder that marathon swims are selling out. Race Director Dick Sidner (on right) tells about the U.S. Masters Swimming 25K National Championships on June 18th. “We have field of 68 swimmers entered in the 25 km solo swim and at least 30 relays. [The size of the field] is a testament to the growth of open water swimming and especially within U.S. Masters Swimming. There is still a month for late entries into the relay field, but the solo field is closed..” Copyright © 2011 by World Open Water Swimming Association