Remembering Kate Steels' Ice Sevens and Her Son Dan

Remembering Kate Steels’ Ice Sevens and Her Son Dan

52-year-old Kate Steels became the third human in history to complete the Ice Sevens, after American Jaimie Monahan of New York and Irishman Ger Kennedy.

Steels received her Ice Sevens certificate from the International Ice Swimming Association. “I am feeling very proud to have received my ICE Sevens Certificate. My Ice Mile journey has taken me to some amazing places in the world and I have made many new friends around the globe. I would like to thank everyone who has believed in me and helped me. A strong support team is critical to each swim. A big thank you to AXA Insurance for sponsoring my last Ice Mile.

It has been a journey of nearly 7 years and I have had to overcome many hurdles and some massive personal challenges. The hardest thing was trying to find a way to keep going through what I believe is the worst thing that can ever happen in the world. In 2018, I tragically lost Daniel, my only son [at the age of 19, shown above], just two days after he started University.My life has been totally shattered. He was my only child. I cannot put into words the excruciating heartache and utter devastation I feel together with the rest of my family.

My family, swimming friends and the physical activity of swimming, particularly Ice Swimming, helps me. Nothing can describe the excruciating pain and heartbreak.

I miss Daniel every single day and always will. In Dan’s memory, I am raising funds for the Samaritans. If you feel able to spare a few pennies and donate it would be greatly appreciated and it will make a real difference. Nobody should have to go through this. Thank you too, to everyone who has already donated.”

To donate, visit here.

Steels has completed 9 career Ice Miles to date; of which these 7 enabled her to complete the Ice Sevens. Her photos are below of her swims and support crews:

Steels’ 7th Ice Mile in South America (Lake Esmeralda, Argentina) in November 2021
Steels’ 7th Ice Mile in 4.2°C water in 29 minutes 19 seconds in Lake Esmeralda, Argentina
Steel’s 6th Ice Mile in Oceania in Lake Lyndon, New Zealand in August 2019
Steel’s 6th Ice Mile in Oceania, a point-to-point swim in Lake Lyndon, New Zealand in 3.93°C water in 31 minutes 57 seconds
Steels’ 4th Ice Mile (Zero Ice Mile) in Asia in South Lake, Shuangyashan City, China in December 2017
Steels’ 4th Zero Ice Mile in South Lake, Shuangyashan City, China in 0.90°C water and -22.10°C wind chill in 35 minutes 5 seconds
Steels’ 5th Ice Mile in North America in Lake Simcoe, Beaverton, Canada in 2019
Steels’ 5th Ice Mile in North America in Lake Simcoe, Beaverton, Canada in 4.13°C water and 7.90°C wind chill in 31 minutes 42 seconds. Photo courtesy of Ali Greene
Steels’2nd Polar Ice Mile in Mikkelvik Brygge, Karlsøy, Norway in March 2017
Steels’2nd Polar Ice Mile in Norway in 2.37°C water and -7.30°C wind chill, swimming in 33 minutes 16 seconds at 70.01°N latitude.
Steels’3rd Ice Mile in Africa in Lac Aguelmame Sidi Ali, Atlas Mountains, Morocco in December 2017
Steels’3rd Ice Mile in Africa in Morocco in 3.83°C water and -2.00°C wind chill in 35 minutes 0 seconds
Steels’ 1st Ice Mile in Europe in Andark Lake, Bursledon, Southampton, UK in January 2015, photographed by Terry Scott
Steels’ 1st Ice Mile in Andark Lake, Bursledon, Southampton, UK in 3.90°C water and -1.00°C wind chill in 32 minutes 50 seconds

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