The Relative Consistency Of Swimming Around The Clock

The Relative Consistency Of Swimming Around The Clock

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

It was all difficult fun: 24 straight hours swimming in Aquatic Park in San Francisco, California as a relay. The swimmers switched on and off with their teammates swimming, napping, laughing, and eating.

While Madhuri Yechuri of India completed all her hour-long legs during the 24 Hour Relay in San Francisco swimming butterfly, both day and night during the 2016 event, Bruckner Chase of Ocean City Swim Club in New Jersey swam freestyle throughout the 2014 event with a Suunto GPS watch on.

We wondered how far the swimmers each swam during this 24-hour marathon relay and how their distances varied on each leg.

Chase gave us insight on his own distances swum over his 7 legs during the 2014 event:

Leg 1 at 8:57 am, he swam 1,300 yards in 14 minutes 29 seconds or 1:11.4 per 100 yards
Leg 2 at 11:28 am, he swam 1,300 yards in 14 minutes 35 seconds or 1:12.1 per 100 yards
Leg 3 at 1:47 pm, he swam 1,300 yards in 14 minutes 18 seconds or 1:11.0 per 100 yards
Leg 4 at 5:25 pm, he swam 1,300 yards in 13 minutes 55 seconds or 1:07.0 per 100 yards
Leg 5 at 9:36 am, he swam 1,300 yards in 15 minutes 15 seconds or 1:22.5 per 100 yards
Leg 6 at 2:26 am, he swam 1,600 yards in 19 minutes 19 seconds or 1:20.7 per 100 yards
Leg 7 at 6:49 am, he swam 2,600 yards in 29 minutes 10 seconds or 1:12.1 per 100 yards

Despite the rains, winds, and water and air temperatures dipping down into the high 40sºF (sub-10ºC), Chase’s pacing was remarkably even throughout the day and night [see video below] – something that is usually the case with many marathon and channel swimmers, all things being equal.

Video of the 2015 24 Hour Swim Relay courtesy of Lisa Amorao, Cathy Harrington, Laura Leahy, Anne Whalen McLindon, Melissa King and Suzie Dods from Aquatic Park in San Francisco Bay.

Copyright © 2015 by World Open Water Swimming Association