Descenso a Nado de la Ria de Navia

Descenso a Nado de la Ria de Navia

Started in 1958 when 14 swimmers swam 1 kilometer in a coastal village in Asturias, Galicia in northern Spain

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Description

The Descenso a Nado Ría de Navia (or Navia Estuary Downstream Swim) is one of the World’s Top 100 Open Water Swims. It is a multi-race event held annually held in early August on the northern coast of Spain. It is in its 56th edition in 2013. It offers a 5 km men’s race, a 3 km women’s race, a 1.7 km masters race and a 1.1 km junior race with cash prizes for the men’s 5 km and the women’s 3 km races of 1000€ for the winner, 700€ for second and 400€ for third. It is also combined on the same weekend as the Copa Asturias (Asturias Cup. The Descenso a Nado Ría de Navia has been broadcast on live television on Spain’s TPA and organized by the Amigos de la Ría de Navia.

Name of Race

Descenso a Nado de la Ria de Navia

Event Nickname

Navia Estuary Downstream Swim

Event Month

August

Region

Europe

Body of Water

Navia River, Spain

Distances Offered

1-2k
2-3k
4-5k

Temperature

Moderate

Experience

Intermediate
Advanced

Water Type

River

Swim Type

Race

Videos

Statistic

320 Views
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